Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation

Symposia

Uncovering untold stories about Queensland and the First World War.

About the symposia

The annual symposium program aims to uncover stories about Queensland and the First World War. A key note speaker will lead the discussion at each symposium panel discussion with commentators, writers and experts.

On the Home Front 10 & 11 May 2016

Like much of Australia during the war years, Queensland was a divided society. Debates about conscription, the changing role of women and the growing number of broken families characterised a society that was struggling to cope with rapid systemic change.

On the home front symposium brought together Australia’s leading historical thinkers and commentators to discuss and explore how the First World War was experienced by those that did not leave Australia to fight in a faraway war, but remained at home during the war – in their community, in their family. How did wider social, political and cultural factors impact the lives of those on the home front?

Stories about life on the home front are sometimes regarded as secondary to the military history and battle stories of the First World War. For some, the real history of the First World War took place on the battlefields
of Gallipoli, Amiens, and Villers-Bretonneux rather than in the communities of Bundaberg, Brisbane and Charters Towers. On the home front challenged this view by illuminating the significance of home front history and its enduring legacy.

On the home front Session 1. Launch and Keynote.

Speakers:

  • Opening musical performance by John Thompson
  • Keynote presentation by Professor Joan Beaumont, Australian National University
  • Q&A facilitated by Ian Townsend.

On the home front Session 2. Opening Address.

Speaker:

  • Sonia Cooper, State Librarian and CEO

On the home front Session 3.

Speaker:

  • Professor Mick Dodson, Australian National University

On the home front Session 4. Keynotes panel discussion.

Speakers:

  • Professor Joan Beaumont, Australian National University
  • Professor Mick Dodson, Australian National University
  • Q&A Facilitated by Ian Townsend

On the home front Session 5. The lives of others. Why is Your Face so White Mother?: Women and the Conscription Debates 1916–1917.

Speaker:

  • Professor Joy Damousi, University of Melbourne

On the home front Session 6. The lives of others. Unity or Division?: The Queensland Homefront in World War I.

Speaker:

  • Dr Raymond Evans, Griffith University and University of Queensland

On the home front Session 7. The lives of others. Fighting the war at home – the campaign against enemy aliens in WW1 Australia.

Speakers:

  • Adjunct Professor Gerhard Fischer, University of New South Wales

On the home front Session 8. The lives of others panel discussion

Speakers:

  • Professor Joy Damousi, University of Melbourne
  • Dr Raymond Evans, Griffith University and University of Queensland
  • Adjunct Professor Gerhard Fischer, University of New South Wales
  • Q&A Facilitated by Ian Townsend

On the home front Session 9. Hearts and Minds. They also serve: children and families on the home front – Queensland in World War One.

Speaker:

  • Professor John Pearn, University of Queensland

On the home front Session 10. Hearts and Minds.  Telling difficult family war stories: searching for Hector Thomson.

Speaker:

  • Professor Alistair Thomson, Monash University

On the home front Session 11. Hearts and Minds.  Grasping harpies and desperate women: fortune-telling during the First World War.

Speaker:

  • Dr Alana Piper, Griffith University

On the home front Session 12. Hearts and Minds Panel Discussion.

Speakers:

  • Professor John Pearn, University of Queensland
  • Professor Alistair Thomson, Monash University
  • Dr Alana Piper, Griffith University

How We Remember 13 & 14 October 2015

“History would be a wonderful thing – if only it were true” — Leo Tolstoy.

As we move further into the four year commemoration period it would be easy to think that we have reached ‘peak Anzac’. There would be very few Australians that have not heard about or participated in some kind of commemoration activity. In this post-Gallipoli centenary milieu, it is timely then to think about what we are choosing to remember and commemorate. Which Anzac stories are important to retell, and how will a new generation of Australians identify with them?

How We Remember Session 1

Speakers:

  • Adjunct Associate Professor James Brown, Director of the Alliance 21 program, US Studies Centre, University of Sydney
  • Stephanie Brantz, Facilitator, ABC journalist

How We Remember Session 2

Speakers:

  • Dr Carolyn Holbrook, historian and author of Anzac: the unauthorised biography
  • Adjunct Associate Professor James Brown, Director of the Alliance 21 program, US Studies Centre, University of Sydney
  • Stephanie Brantz, Facilitator, ABC journalist
  • Gavin Bannerman, Executive Manager Queensland Memory, State Library of Queensland

How We Remember Session 3

Speakers:

  • Kate Aubusson  journalist and presenter of ABC documentary, Lest We Forget What
  • Associate Professor Martin Crotty  School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry, University of Queensland
  • Francis Leach  Broadcaster, DJ, Journalist, Writer and lover of ideas

How We Remember Session 4

Speakers:

  • Kristin Berardi, Brisbane based Jazz singer and musician
  • David Roach, screenwriter and producer, Beneath Hill 60
  • Sven Swenson, Brisbane playwright and creator of the play TipToe
  • Robyn Hamilton, State Library of Queensland Q ANZAC 100 project content curator
  • Eric Law, Chairman of the Cherbourg Anzac 100 Committee and supporter of the Cherbourg Ration Shed Museum
  • Harjit Singh, representative from Australian Sikh Heritage

Serving Country Forum 26 September 2014

In September 2014, State Library of Queensland hosted The Serving Country Forum, part of Q ANZAC 100: Memories for a New Generation. When war was declared in 1914, many Indigenous men were the first to try to enlist, although it wasn’t until April 1917 that Indigenous enlistment was permitted. These young men fought valiantly for their country, they stood side by side with their fellow Australians in the hope of bringing equality to their communities. Until recently these stories and this history was virtually unknown. Native Title Barrister Joshua Creamer hosted the Forum which explored 100 years of Indigenous service with a focus on the First World War.

Serving Country Forum Session 1

Speakers:

  • Joshua Creamer, Native Title Barrister and Chairman of Titans 4 Tomorrow
  • Janette Wright, CEO & State Librarian, State Library of Queensland
  • Keynote Address Dr Jackie Huggins AM, FAHA, Author, Historian and Indigenous Affairs Consultant
  • Keynote Response Des Crump, Indigenous Languages Coordinator, State Library of Queensland

Serving Country Forum Session 2

Speakers:

  • Gary Oakley, Indigenous Liaison Officer, Australian War Memorial
  • David Williams, Researcher and historian, Black Diggers
  • Des Crump, Indigenous Languages Coordinator, State Library of Queensland
  • Keynote Response Des Crump, Indigenous Languages Coordinator, State Library of Queensland.

Serving Country Forum Session 3

Speakers:

  • Wesley Enoch, Artistic Director, Queensland Theatre Company and Director of Black Diggers
  • Dale Kerwin, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Dedicated Memorial Committee Queensland
  • Tony Albert, Artist and Winner of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, 2014

Serving Country Forum Session 4

Speakers:

  • Uncle Eric Law, Cherbourg Elder, Veteran and Mayor of Cherbourg
  • Sally Lawrence, Boys of Barambah project, Cherbourg Historical Precinct Group
  • Rory O’Connor, Director of Yugambeh Museum
  • Linda McBride-Yuke, inaugural black & write! Editor

A street parade in Yandilla Street, Pittsworth, ca. 1899 Negative No: 73484